Impact of Biofield Treatment on Chemical and Thermal Properties of Cellulose and Cellulose Acetate

By Mahendra Kumar Trivedi1, Gopal Nayak1, Shrikant Patil1, Rama Mohan Tallapragada1, Rakesh Mishra1

1. Trivedi Global Inc.

Published on

Abstract

Cellulose being an excellent biopolymer has cemented its place firmly in many industries as a coating material, textile, composites, and biomaterial applications. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of biofield treatment on physicochemical properties of cellulose and cellulose acetate. The cellulose and cellulose acetate were exposed to biofield and further the chemical and thermal properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction study asserted that the biofield treatment did affect the crystalline nature of cellulose. The percentage of crystallite size was found increased significantly in treated cellulose by 159.83%, as compared to control sample. This showed that biofield treatment was changing the crystalline nature of treated cellulose. However treated cellulose acetate showed a reduction in crystallite size (-17.38%) as compared to control sample. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) of treated cellulose showed no improvement in melting temperature as compared to control sample. Contrarily cellulose acetate showed significant improvement in melting temperature peak at 351.91ºC as compared to control (344ºC) polymer. Moreover percentage change in latent heat of fusion (∆H) was calculated from the DSC thermogram of both treated and control polymers. A significant increase in percentage ∆H of both treated cellulose (59.09%) and cellulose acetate (105.79%) polymers indicated that biofield treatment enhanced the thermal stability of the treated polymers. CHNSO analysis revealed a significant change in percentage hydrogen and oxygen of treated cellulose (%H-17.77, %O-16.89) and cellulose acetate (%H-5.67, %O-13.41). Though minimal change was observed in carbon percentage of both treated cellulose (0.29%) and cellulose acetate (0.39%) polymers as compared to their respective control samples. Thermo gravimetric analysis and Differential thermo gravimetric (TGA-DTG) analysis of treated cellulose acetate (353ºC) showed increased maximum thermal decomposition temperature as compared to control polymer (351ºC). This showed the higher thermal stability of the treated cellulose acetate polymer; although the maximum thermal decomposition temperature of treated cellulose (248ºC) was decreased as compared to control cellulose (321ºC). These outcomes confirmed that biofield treatment has changed the physicochemical properties of the cellulose polymers.

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Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Trivedi MK, Nayak G, Patil S, Tallapragada RM, Mishra R (2015) Impact of Biofield Treatment on Chemical and Thermal Properties of Cellulose and Cellulose Acetate. J Bioengineer & Biomedical Sci 5: 162. doi:10.4172/2155- 9538.1000162
     

  • Mahendra Kumar Trivedi; Gopal Nayak; Shrikant Patil; Rama Mohan Tallapragada; Rakesh Mishra (2019), "Impact of Biofield Treatment on Chemical and Thermal Properties of Cellulose and Cellulose Acetate," https://diagrid.org/resources/1642.

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